Human Motivation and Interpersonal Relationships

 

Just recently released in early 2014, Human Motivation and Interpersonal Relationships, edited by SDT Faculty Netta Weinstein,  summarizes and organizes a growing body of research supporting the role of motivation in adaptive and rewarding interpersonal interactions with others.

Many outstanding SDT scholars have contributed to this book and their research in the fields of SDT and interpersonal relationships is nicely reflected here.  Both fields have seen extensive growth in the past decade and each can contribute to the other. However, no single compiled work is available that targets both fields. This is the case, in part, because only now is there enough work to make a strong and compelling case for their integration. In the previous years, research has been conducted to show that motivation is relevant and important for interactions among strangers and in close relationships. In addition, developmental mechanisms for these relations are identified, and mechanisms by which motivation strengthens people’s relationships. Finally, recent work has demonstrated the many implications for interpersonal relationships, showing that motivation impacts a range of interpersonal processes from prejudice regulation and objectification of others to empathy and care. This book seeks to summarize and organize all these findings and present them in a way that is relevant to both motivation researchers and social and relationship researchers.

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